The Value of Time by Bertie Farrell

You can make more money, but you cannot make more time.

Time management and work/life management become critical survival tactics the higher up the career ladder you go. In this fast paced world, the crush of daily work and home life can overwhelm the most talented leaders. Deadlines, projects and to-do lists often constitute much of our busy lives. As a single mom and VP of Operations for a Fortune 500 company with 1600 people reporting to me, I often ran out of week before all the tasks that needed to be done were done. Work routinely leaked into personal time usurping precious family time. It hurt me to say, “ I can’t….., I have to work.” After all, I was working for their benefit, yet work prevented me from enjoying leisure time with them. There was a chasm between what was deeply important to me and how I was actually spending my time.

by Stephen R. Covey is a timeless manual on how to actually spend the hours of the days doing those things that are most important. From this book, I learned how to create a family time appointment, that was a firm commitment made in advance and held sacred. It was a placeholder so the urgent did not steal the important time. I learned how to better delegate and hold employees accountable focusing on benchmarks agreed to in advance. I learned to get out of ‘urgency addiction’ by focusing my time on the most important priorities rather than reacting to a chain of unwanted tasks, originating from someone else, usually in crisis. This book delivers tools to align our time with our personal values and governing principles – highly valuable skills for leaders. Here is a link to a five minute Youtube video on aspects of the book; https://youtu.be/5bg2pOMsQIk

One comment

  1. Bertie, so much of your words resonated with me when I was a single mum trying to build a career… so many trade-offs to find the right balance and it took many years to figure it out. One phrase that has stuck with me for nearly two decades from one of my most inspiring managers was “Don’t confuse the flapping of wings with forward motion”. Whenever I see myself or my colleagues overwhelmed with tasks and struggling, I stop, reflect on those words and then redirect my time or theirs onto tasks that will be productive and meaningful. Great article.

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